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Saturday, 06 February, 2016
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    Embroidery is a deceptively simple craft.  It is easy, relaxing, and one of the least expensive hobbies you can take up. During this class we will learn two simple stitches, called the satin stitch and the split stitch.  Each student will be given, the fabric with the pattern imprinted on it, the floss (thread) needed, and the hoop, and a bag to carry your supplies in.  Students will need to bring a thimble (if you chose to use one), a pair of scissors.

    Tags: Academy of Lifelong Learning | Alumni | Community | Current Students | Faculty
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    Whether you are starting off your activity goals or looking to spice up your current regime, EIU Moves can help you reach your New Year’s goals and a healthier you! This program includes a variety of FREE short nutrition workshops and group fitness classes for four Saturdays, beginning January 23.

    Tags: Current Students | Health Education Resource Center | TotalEIU
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    A series of free story times for children is planned at the Ballenger Teachers Center at Booth Library.

    Story times at Booth Library are planned from 10 to 11 a.m. on Feb. 6, 13, 20, 27; March 5; and April 2. Programs are free and will feature stories, crafts and activities. Children ages 3 to 7 are invited to attend and must be accompanied by a parent or guardian.

    For more information about the Ballenger Teachers Center at Booth Library, visit http://www.library.eiu.edu/btc/ or call 581-8442.

    Tags: Alumni | Booth Library | Community | Current Students | Faculty
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    Over 2,000 years ago the Roman poet and philosopher Lucretius wrote an epic didactic poem, De rerum natura (On the Nature of Things), with the intent of explaining the laws of nature and the primary principles of Epicurean philosophy. Krause, inspired by this extraordinary poem, began wondering what was the “nature of things” in his life and how this might be expressed in painting. This series of paintings explores his experiences concerning the relationships between job, family, love/sex, mortality, pleasure, responsibilities and obligations, travel and what comes next.

    Krause is a Cincinnati native whose paintings have been included in more than 100 exhibitions both nationally and internationally, including eight solo exhibitions. The artist’s work has been purchased for numerous public and corporate collections including the Cincinnati Art Museum, Chase Manhattan Bank and Fidelity Investments, among others. Krause has been awarded numerous artist residencies including the Atlantic Center for the Arts in Florida; Rathausgalerie in Munich; The Cooper Union in New York; and the Chateau in Rochefort-en-Terre, France. He is a Professor of Art at the Art Academy of Cincinnati and Chair of the Department of Fine Arts.

    Tags: Tarble Arts Center
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    Most artists would like to make work that matters to them, while also sustaining their ability to live. WORK Cycle is an exhibition that explores this tension between artist and artrepreneur. Using the work of Mac Premo, the show seeks to illuminate the fine and precarious lines that an artist balances between working in the fine arts and working commercially. WORK Cycle is an exhibition that displays Premo’s wordplay and work process, while also being introspective, tongue-in-cheek, and at times–a bit of a conundrum. Overall, the show is an observation about how two worlds collide in the best possible of ways.

    Mac Premo is an American artist and stuffmaker, who graduated from RISD in 1995. He has exhibited art in NYC, LA, Miami, DC and Belfast, Northern Ireland. Premo is represented by Pavel Zoubok Gallery in NYC. He has won 7 New York Emmy® Awards, including awards for best commercial, best photography, best set design and best PSA. A 2008 NYFA fellow in video, Premo currently makes art, illustration, commercials and most nights, dinner. Premo lives in Brooklyn with his wife and totally radical daughters.

    Tags: Tarble Arts Center
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    CCT's production of An Evening Backstage will be presented in the TAC Atrium at 7:30 pm on 29 & 30 January and 4-6 February and at 2 pm on 31 January. Three one-act comedies are offered for your mid-winter entertainment: The Professional, Laughs, and Who Am I This Time? The first two are drawn from Mary Louise Wilson's Theatrical Haiku, the third from a play by Aaron Posner based on a Kurt Vonnegut short story. Doors open 30 minutes before curtain. Reservations can be made through our Facebook page (Charleston Community Theatre - and while you're there, please "Like" us and share the event), our website (charlestoncommunitytheatre.com), or by phone: 877-842-3267 (FANS)

    Tags: Alumni | Arts and Entertainment | Community | Current Students | Faculty | Prospective Students | Theatre Arts Department
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    Dust, Drought, and Dreams Gone Dry,” a national traveling exhibition about the causes and aftermath of the historic Dust Bowl period, will be on display at Booth Library from Jan. 11-Feb. 26.

    The exhibition recalls a tragic period in our history — the drought and dust storms that wreaked havoc on the Great Plains in the 1930s — and explores its environmental and cultural consequences. It raises several thought-provoking questions: What caused fertile farms to turn to dust? How did people survive? What lessons can we learn?

    Tags: Booth Library
  • View more February 6 events
Sunday, 07 February, 2016
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    Over 2,000 years ago the Roman poet and philosopher Lucretius wrote an epic didactic poem, De rerum natura (On the Nature of Things), with the intent of explaining the laws of nature and the primary principles of Epicurean philosophy. Krause, inspired by this extraordinary poem, began wondering what was the “nature of things” in his life and how this might be expressed in painting. This series of paintings explores his experiences concerning the relationships between job, family, love/sex, mortality, pleasure, responsibilities and obligations, travel and what comes next.

    Krause is a Cincinnati native whose paintings have been included in more than 100 exhibitions both nationally and internationally, including eight solo exhibitions. The artist’s work has been purchased for numerous public and corporate collections including the Cincinnati Art Museum, Chase Manhattan Bank and Fidelity Investments, among others. Krause has been awarded numerous artist residencies including the Atlantic Center for the Arts in Florida; Rathausgalerie in Munich; The Cooper Union in New York; and the Chateau in Rochefort-en-Terre, France. He is a Professor of Art at the Art Academy of Cincinnati and Chair of the Department of Fine Arts.

    Tags: Tarble Arts Center
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    Most artists would like to make work that matters to them, while also sustaining their ability to live. WORK Cycle is an exhibition that explores this tension between artist and artrepreneur. Using the work of Mac Premo, the show seeks to illuminate the fine and precarious lines that an artist balances between working in the fine arts and working commercially. WORK Cycle is an exhibition that displays Premo’s wordplay and work process, while also being introspective, tongue-in-cheek, and at times–a bit of a conundrum. Overall, the show is an observation about how two worlds collide in the best possible of ways.

    Mac Premo is an American artist and stuffmaker, who graduated from RISD in 1995. He has exhibited art in NYC, LA, Miami, DC and Belfast, Northern Ireland. Premo is represented by Pavel Zoubok Gallery in NYC. He has won 7 New York Emmy® Awards, including awards for best commercial, best photography, best set design and best PSA. A 2008 NYFA fellow in video, Premo currently makes art, illustration, commercials and most nights, dinner. Premo lives in Brooklyn with his wife and totally radical daughters.

    Tags: Tarble Arts Center
  • |

    Dust, Drought, and Dreams Gone Dry,” a national traveling exhibition about the causes and aftermath of the historic Dust Bowl period, will be on display at Booth Library from Jan. 11-Feb. 26.

    The exhibition recalls a tragic period in our history — the drought and dust storms that wreaked havoc on the Great Plains in the 1930s — and explores its environmental and cultural consequences. It raises several thought-provoking questions: What caused fertile farms to turn to dust? How did people survive? What lessons can we learn?

    Tags: Booth Library
  • View more February 7 events
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