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EIU Department of Philosophy

Philosophy Course Listing

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PHILOSOPHY DEPARTMENT COURSE DESCRIPTIONS - 2017


PHI 1000G

- God, Freedom, Knowledge and Values: An Introduction to Philosophical Questions. (3-0-3) On Demand. An introduction to philosophy through ancient, medieval, modern and contemporary sources. The course includes main areas such as ethics, metaphysics, epistemology, and philosophy of religion. Credits: 3

PHI 1090G

- God, Freedom, Knowledge and Values: An Introduction to Philosophical Questions, Honors. (3-0-3) On Demand. An introduction to philosophy through ancient, medieval, modern, and contemporary sources. The course includes main areas such as ethics, metaphysics, epistemology, and philosophy of religion. WI Prerequisites & Notes: Admission to the University Honors College. Credits: 3

PHI 1900G

- Logical and Critical Reasoning. (3-0-3) F, S. A study of the structure and evaluation of arguments, focusing upon: analysis and informal evaluation of everyday arguments; problem-solving strategies; formal tests of validity; conversational contexts of argumentation, and the interaction of contextual principles with principles of validity. H4 906 Credits: 3

PHI 1990G

- Logical and Critical Reasoning, Honors. (3-0-3) F, S. A study of the structure and evaluation of arguments, focusing upon analysis and informal evaluation of everyday arguments; problem-solving strategies; formal tests of validity; conversational contexts of argumentation, and the interaction of contextual principles with principles of validity. WI Prerequisites & Notes: Admission to the University Honors College. Credits: 3

PHI 2000

- Ancient Philosophy. (3-0-3) F. An introductory historical approach to the ideas of Socrates, Plato, Aristotle and selected early Greek philosophers. H4 901; WI Credits: 3

PHI 2010

- Eastern Philosophies. (3-0-3) S-even-numbered years. An introduction to the traditional philosophical-religious ideas of the life and culture of China, India, and Japan. H4 903N; WI Credits: 3

PHI 2090

- Ancient Philosophy, Honors. (3-0-3) S-even-numbered years. An introductory historical approach to the ideas of Socrates, Plato, Aristotle and selected early Greek philosophers. H4 901 Prerequisites & Notes: Admission to the University Honors College. Credits: 3

PHI 2590G

- The Good Life: An Introduction to Ethics, Honors. (3-0-3) On Demand. This course offers a critical examination of a variety of contemporary issues such as abortion, euthanasia, animal welfare and capital punishment. Ethical theories such as Utilitarianism, Kantianism, Relativism, Egoism and Natural Law are also examined. WI Prerequisites & Notes: Admission to the University Honors College. Credits: 3

PHI 3012

- Philosophy of Sex and Love. (3-0-3) On Demand. This course examines the meaning and nature of sex and love. The goal is to help students reflect on how to live out their own sexuality while gaining empathy for other views. We will examine contemporary debates concerning the nature of romantic love, sexual fantasies, casual sex, consent theory, the purpose(s) of sex, what it means to “use” someone, masturbation, objectification, sadomasochism, pornography, homosexuality, marriage, and many other topics. WI Credits: 3

PHI 3020

- Ethics. (3-0-3) On Demand. Analysis and evaluation of major normative ethical theories such as Utilitarianism, Relativism and Kant’s deontological ethics. May also include issues in meta-ethics such as those concerning the nature and existence of moral properties such as “right” and “good.” WI Credits: 3

PHI 3030

- Science and Human Values. (3-0-3) F-odd-numbered years. An introductory examination of the character of scientific inquiry and its impact on religion, moral and political values. WI Credits: 3

PHI 3040

- Philosophy of Art. (3-0-3) F-even-numbered years. A critical examination of aesthetic experience and fine art: artistic creativity, the work of art, and criteria of judgment. WI Credits: 3

PHI 3050G

- Social and Political Philosophy. (3-0-3) F-odd-numbered years. A study of some theoretical approaches to understanding social, economic, and political relations. The focus will be on political liberty and its critics from Marxist, feminist, and other perspectives. WI Prerequisites & Notes: ENG 1001G and ENG 1002G. Credits: 3

PHI 3070

- Philosophy of Law. (3-0-3) On Demand. An assessment of philosophical aspects of the law such as how human laws relate to God’s laws or moral laws; when civil disobedience is justified; whether rights can be limited; nature of responsibility and punishment; and selected current topics. WI Credits: 3

PHI 3080

- Medical Ethics. (3-0-3) On Demand. This course examines the application of ethics in the context of medical practice, policy and research. Basic ethical theories are applied to medical issues in a way that involves understanding the social context in which these problems arise. Issues may include personhood, our obligations to the sick and dying, the allocation of scarce resources, informed consent, autonomy, paternalism, and others. WI Credits: 3

PHI 3100G

- Cultural Foundations I. (3-0-3) F, S. An in-depth look at three cultural foundations, two Western and one African. The course examines societies and values by exploring primary texts in literature, philosophy, and religion. Cross-listed with ENG 3100G. WI Prerequisites & Notes: ENG 1001G, ENG 1002G. Credits: 3

PHI 3110G

- Cultural Foundations II. (3-0-3) S. An in-depth look at three significant Eastern cultural foundations. The course examines societies and values by exploring primary texts in literature, philosophy and religion. Cross-listed with ENG 3110G. WI Prerequisites & Notes: ENG 1001G and ENG 1002G. Credits: 3

PHI 3220

- Medieval Philosophy. (3-0-3) S-odd-numbered years. An examination of the principal philosophers from Epicurus through St. Thomas Aquinas. WI Credits: 3

PHI 3260

- Modern Philosophy. (3-0-3) S. Philosophical thought during the scientific revolution and the Enlightenment, including the influence of the new sciences and of reason on religious, moral, and metaphysical beliefs. Readings include Descartes, Hume, and Kant. WI Credits: 3

PHI 3280

- Nineteenth Century Philosophy. (3-0-3) F-even-numbered years. Focuses on the post-Enlightenment critique of objective truth given historical, economic, and cultural situatedness. Readings include Hegel, Marx, and Nietzsche. WI Prerequisites & Notes: Three semester hours in Philosophy or permission of the instructor. Credits: 3

PHI 3290

- Modern Philosophy, Honors. (3-0-3) F-even-numbered years. Philosophic thought from Galileo to Kant; the foundations of modern science and implications for religious, moral and political theory. Prerequisites & Notes: Admission to the University Honors College. Credits: 3

PHI 3310

- Indian Philosophy. (3-0-3) F-even-numbered years. A comprehensive study of the philosophical and religious traditions of Indian thought and culture. WI Prerequisites & Notes: Three semester hours in Philosophy or permission of the instructor. Credits: 3

PHI 3320

- Chinese Philosophy. (3-0-3) S-even-numbered years. A comprehensive study of the philosophical and religious traditions of Chinese culture. WI Prerequisites & Notes: Three semester hours in Philosophy or permission of the instructor. Credits: 3

PHI 3500

- Metaphysics. (3-0-3) S-odd-numbered years. This course is an examination of contemporary analytical metaphysics: topics include the nature of truth, identity (including personal identity), possible worlds, material constitution and freedom of the will. WI Prerequisites & Notes: Three semester hours in Philosophy or permission of the instructor. Credits: 3

PHI 3540

- Philosophy of Mind. (3-0-3) F-even-numbered years. A study of the major issues surrounding the concepts of mind and consciousness, and the nature of the intellectual faculties, as dealt with both historically and in contemporary theories of cognition. WI Credits: 3

PHI 3600

- Philosophy of Religion. (3-0-3) F-odd-numbered-years. A philosophical interpretation of religion, religious experience, and fundamental problems: God, evil, immortality, religious knowledge. WI Prerequisites & Notes: Three semester hours in Philosophy or permission of the instructor. Credits: 3

PHI 3680

- Buddhism. (3-0-3) S-odd-numbered years. An in-depth study of the philosophical, religious and historical aspects of Buddhism. WI Prerequisites & Notes: Three semester hours in Philosophy or permission of the instructor. Credits: 3

PHI 3700G

- Language and Human Nature. (3-0-3) On Demand. A study of human language structure as an object of scientific inquiry and its relation to questions of human nature. WI Credits: 3

PHI 3720

- Theory of Knowledge. (3-0-3) F-odd-numbered years. This course is an examination of contemporary epistemology: topics include the nature of rationality, truth, an analysis of knowledge, and a study of the sources of human knowledge. WI Prerequisites & Notes: Three semester hours in Philosophy or permission of the instructor. Credits: 3

PHI 3780

- Philosophy of Science. (3-0-3) S-even-numbered years. A study of the major philosophical views concerning the nature and practice of science, and including such topics as theory, experimentation, and the relation of these to reality and human life. WI Credits: 3

PHI 3800

- Phenomenology and Existentialism. (3-0-3) F-even-numbered years. An examination of the leading exponents of the phenomenological movement in 20th century philosophy, including existentialism. The course will cover such figures as Husserl, Heidegger, Sartre, Jaspers and Merleau-Ponty. WI Credits: 3

PHI 3820

- Contemporary European Philosophy. (3-0-3) S-odd-numbered years. A survey of contemporary movements in European philosophy, including hermeneutics, deconstruction, critical theory, post-structuralism, and post-modernism. Covers the later Heidegger, Derrida, Foucault, Habermas, Ricoeur, Gadamer, Lyotard and Rorty. WI Credits: 3

PHI 3900

- Symbolic Logic. (3-0-3) On Demand. A survey of formal methods for analyzing and evaluating arguments. Prerequisites & Notes: PHI 1900G or permission of the instructor. Credits: 3

PHI 3970

- Study Abroad. (Arr.-Arr.-1-15) See STA 3970. Credits: 1 to 15

PHI 3980

- Special Topics in Philosophy. (3-0-3) On Demand. An in-depth treatment of a single topic or figure in Philosophy, reflecting the special interests of students and the instructor. May be repeated once for credit. Credits: 3

PHI 4400A

- Independent Study I. (Arr.-Arr.1-6) Intensive individual study of a topic in Philosophy selected by the student under supervision of the instructor. Prerequisites & Notes: Approval of the department chairperson. The student must submit a study plan for approval by the department chair and faculty supervisor prior to registration. With permission of the department chairperson, a maximum of six semester hours may be earned in a combination of PHI 4400A, PHI 4400B, PHI 4400D and applied to the Philosophy major or minor. May be repeated once for credit. Credits: 1 to 6

PHI 4400B

- Independent Study II (Arr.-Arr.1-6) Intensive individual study of a topic in Philosophy selected by the student under supervision of the instructor. Prerequisites & Notes: Approval of the department chairperson. The student must submit a study plan for approval by the department chair and faculty supervisor prior to registration. With permission of the department chairperson, a maximum of six semester hours may be earned in a combination of PHI 4400A, PHI 4400B, PHI 4400D and applied to the Philosophy major or minor. May be repeated once for credit. Credits: 1 to 6

PHI 4400D

- Independent Study III. (Arr.-Arr.1-6) Intensive individual study of a topic in Philosophy selected by the student under supervision of the instructor. Prerequisites & Notes: Approval of the department chairperson. The student must submit a study plan for approval by the department chair and faculty supervisor prior to registration. With permission of the department chairperson, a maximum of six semester hours may be earned in a combination of PHI 4400A, PHI 4400B, PHI 4400D and applied to the Philosophy major or minor. May be repeated once for credit. Credits: 1 to 6

PHI 4444

- Honors Independent Study. (3-0-3) Consideration of special topics in Philosophy. Special emphasis on an area of interest to the student approved by faculty supervisor and Departmental Honors Coordinator. Prerequisites & Notes: Admission to the Departmental Honors Program and permission of the Departmental Honors Coordinator. Credits: 3

PHI 4480

- Seminar. (3-0-3) S. Advanced study of selected problems, topics, or philosophers. WI Prerequisites & Notes: Nine semester hours in Philosophy and permission of the instructor. May be taken twice for credit with permission of the department chairperson. Credits: 3

PHI 4555

- Honors Research. (3-0-3) In consultation with a faculty member, the student designs, executes, and writes the results of an original piece of research. Any methodology may be utilized. Prerequisites & Notes: Admission to the Departmental Honors Program and permission of the Departmental Honors Coordinator. Credits: 3

PHI 4644

- Honors Thesis. (3-0-3) Intensive research in preparation of a thesis on a topic in Philosophy approved by faculty supervisor and the Departmental Honors Coordinator. May be taken twice for credit. Prerequisites & Notes: Admission to the Departmental Honors Program and permission of the Departmental Honors Coordinator. Credits: 3

PHI 4666

- Honors Seminar. (3-0-3) Areas of investigation which require integration of Philosophy and research will be treated. Prerequisites & Notes: Admission to the Departmental Honors Program and permission of the Departmental Honors Coordinator. Credits: 3

Related Pages

Contact Information

Philosophy Department

3542 Coleman Hall
Eastern Illinois University
600 Lincoln Ave.
Charleston, IL 61920
(217) 581-3012

Chair: Jonelle DePetro

jmdepetro@eiu.edu

Office Manager: Leslie Ashley

lsashley@eiu.edu


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