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EIU Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry

Faculty and Staff Listing

Mark E McGuire, Emeritus Professor - Inorganic Chemistry

 


Frequently Taught Courses

CHM 1040G - World of Chemistry
CHM 1310, 1410 - General Chemistry Lecture I, II
CHM 1315, 1415 - General Chemistry Laboratory I, II
CHM 1390, 1490 - Honors General Chemistry Lecture I, II
CHM 1395, 1495 - Honors General Chemistry Laboratory I, II
CHM 1440 - Chemistry Research Rotation
CHM 2040G - Practical Chemistry
CHM 2310 - Inorganic Chemistry I
CHM 2730 - Quantitative Analysis
CHM 3100 - Chemistry Practicum
CHM 3500 - Introduction to Chemical Research
CHM 4400 - Undergraduate Research
CHM 4555 Honors Research
CHM 4644 Honors Thesis
CHM 4900 - Inorganic Chemistry II
CHM 4915 - Advanced Laboratory
CHM 5002 - Introduction to Graduate Chemical Research
CHM 5120 - Theoretical Inorganic Chemistry
CHM 5250 - Special Topics
CHM 5890 - Graduate Research
CHM 5950 - Graduate Thesis
 

Education

B.S., Roberts Wesleyan College, 1978
Ph.D., University of Rochester, 1985
Postdoctoral Fellow, UNC Chapel Hill, 1985-1987

 

Professional Organizations

 

Research

Recent advances in the fabrication of inexpensive nanocrystalline materials such as TiO2 in conjunction with the synthesis of stable photosensitizers (e.g., Ru(II)-polypyridyl complexes) that covalently bond to these materials has allowed construction of robust electrode systems and liquid solar cells that show efficient conversion of visible light to electrical energy. (For example, see O’Regan, B; Grätzel, M.  Nature 1991,353,737, for an often-cited reference.)

Current efforts in our research group, funded by the Petroleum Research Fund of the American Chemical Society, focus on exploiting this technology by attaching photoactive metal complexes of biologically active ligands to TiO2-coated transparent electrodes. Our goal is to promote photoassisted H-atom transfer reactions in order to catalyze chemical transformations using visible light. In other words, we wish to construct solar cells that are capable of using sunlight to provide the energy for chemical synthesis (i.e., artificial photosynthesis).

 

Selected Publications

 

Selected Conference Presentations

 

Funding & Grants

 

Community

 


 


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Contact Information

Department of Chemistry & Biochemistry Chair:
Dr. Edward M. Treadwell

600 Lincoln Avenue, Charleston IL 61920 Physical Science, Room 3150
217-581-5906
emtreadwell@eiu.edu


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