Historical Perspective

SCHOOL OF BUSINESS

The Department of Commerce was initiated in 1937 as part of Eastern's teacher preparation program. In 1946, it became the Business Education Department, and in 1959, it became the Department of Business. The biggest change came in 1962 as the department was reorganized and renamed the School of Business when the non-teaching business majors outnumbered the Business Education majors. The school was housed on the second and third floors of Old Main, and Dr. James Giffin was Dean.

The early 1960's brought an increased demand for business programs in addition to teacher preparation. As a result, curriculum grew to include degree programs in accounting, management, marketing, and secretarial studies. In 1965, the School of Business moved to Blair Hall, and Phi Beta Lambda, Delta Sigma Pi, and Phi Gamma Nu were established. In 1967, Delta Mu Delta was added, and the Masters in Business Administration program was launched in 1968. The school was renamed the Lumpkin College of Business in 1987.

The 1990's brought many changes, most notably the opening of Lumpkin Hall in January, 1990. In 1993, the college was granted accreditation by the Association to Advance Collegiate Schools of Business (AACSB) for its undergraduate and graduate programs. It was also the year the university implemented a restructuring process that combined six academic colleges into four and the Lumpkin College of Business and the College of Applied Sciences were merged into the Lumpkin College of Business and Applied Sciences. Another re-organization occurred on July 1, 1997, when the School of Business began functioning as a unit of the whole, without academic/administrative departments.

SCHOOL OF TECHNOLOGY

The School of Technology established its roots at Eastern in 1902 when courses in Manual Training were offered through handwork courses for teachers. Over the years, courses were added in woodworking, mechanical drawing, lathe, and pattern work. In 1965, the Industrial Technology Program with three options: Light Building Construction, Electronics, and Metals, was approved by the Illinois Board of Higher Education. Dr. Walter Klehm was instrumental in establishing the new School of Industrial Arts and Technology and was appointed Dean of the new school. All of the departments were officially organized into the school, and Dr. Wayne Coleman was named department head of the newly created program. The Applied Arts-Education Center was completed in 1968 to house the new school.

In the 1970's, the School of Industrial Arts and Technology changed to the School of Technology and more advanced course offerings were made and a master's program was added. In 1983, the Industrial Technology program was accredited by the National Association of Industrial Technology with subsequent reaccreditations.

In 1984, the School of Technology, the School of Home Economics, Career Occupations, and Military Science were reorganized into the College of Applied Sciences, and Dr. Barbara Owens was appointed Dean of the college. In 1993, the College of Applied Sciences merged with the Lumpkin College of Business to become the Lumpkin College of Business and Applied Sciences.

The School of Technology has experienced many changes since its inception. The school has grown from an arts and crafts, labor intensive technology to a knowledge intensive technology dealing with topics as varied as modern engineering and mechanics to research in the area of renewable and sustainable energy sources. Instead of laboring over a craft project, students conduct research efforts in the viability of natural materials for use in energy production. Technology will continue to evolve and the School of Technology will play a vital role in the education and research necessary for these technological advancements.

SCHOOL OF FAMILY AND CONSUMER SCIENCES

Domestic Sciences began in 1913 as a two-year degree program. In 1920, the Bachelor of Education, with a four-year degree in Home Economics, was initiated and located in Blair Hall. It moved to the Student Services Building in 1929 when the program was expanded to include classes in dietetics, family meals, household management, equipment and furnishings, and home nursing and child care.

The 1960’s brought about several changes. New options in dietetics and home economics in business were approved. In 1966, the department became the School of Home Economics and had 170 majors. In 1967, the school moved into the new Applied Arts and Education Building (Klehm Hall), and the former Home Management house became the Child Development Lab. Also, the Master of Education degree for home economics majors began, and a new family services option was approved. In 1969, Dr. Mary Ruth Swope was named dean of the School of Home Economics after serving six years as department chair. By 1970, the school had 344 majors.

In ensuing years, home economics, an interdisciplinary program was accredited by the American Home Economics Association; an M.S. in Home Economics and an M.A. in Gerontology were approved; the school became the sponsor of the Peace Meal Senior Nutrition Program in a 12-county area (an affiliation it continued for more than 40 years before ending in 2013); and a hospitality services program was established. Also, a graduate dietetics option was approved with the dietetic internship granted developmental accreditation by the American Dietetic Association. In 1983, the School of Home Economics was merged into the College of Applied Sciences along with the School of Technology, Career Occupations, and Military Science, and Dr. Barbara Owens was named dean.

The 1990’s brought changes, including the establishment of the Child Care Resource and Referral Center. In 1992, Dr. (Owens) Hill was named provost and vice president for academic affairs. In 1993, Eastern reorganized its colleges and merged the College of Applied Sciences with the College of Business into the Lumpkin College of Business and Applied Sciences with Dr. Ted Ivarie as dean. In 1995, the School of Home Economics was renamed the School of Family and Consumer Sciences to reflect the integrative approach to the relationships between individuals, families, communities, and the environments in which they function. The Schools focus has evolved over the years to teach students to be leaders in improving individual, family, and community well-being; impacting the development, delivery, and evaluation of consumer goods and services; influencing the development of policy; and shaping societal change, thereby enhancing the human condition.

DEPARTMENT OF MILITARY SCIENCE

The Department of Military Science began in 1980 as an extension center of the University of Illinois with one instructor and 45 students. In 1981, Eastern was granted host status and authorized a full contingent of military cadre. By 1987, Eastern had the number one ROTC graduate in the nation, Cadet Robert Haycock. The department was merged into the Lumpkin College of Business and Applied Sciences in 1993 and has provided excellent leadership and teamwork challenges over the years to faculty, staff, and student groups at the University.