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Taylor Hall opened to 592 male students in September 1966 after completion of the $3.2 million project. The building was comprised of two wings, each with five residential floors, a main community lobby as well as front desk operations. In the design of the building, it was supposed to mirror Thomas Hall, which had four floors. However, because of the decline in the terrain the perspective would have seen the building as lower than Thomas. Taylor was designed to have five floors, one being half underground in order to make the two buildings appear even.

The transition to Taylor for the men who once lived in Lincoln and Douglas Halls was not an easy one, nor collaborative.  Students did not want to unite immediately, as they had a rich, but seperate, hall histories from their previous buildings. A south council and north council were formed and would have different events available to residents. There were two full time directors and four graduate assistants who oversaw Taylor serving as the advisors for the separate hall councils.


In 1972, Taylor Hall became one of two halls to become co-educational and allow females to live on alternatingTaylor floors.  On September 2, 1976, the Daily Eastern News reported Taylor Hall was the second residence hall (after Thomas) to vote in favor of a 24-hour visitation policy for both the male and female floors. The vote, however, was postponed due to a rise in the amount of unescorted guests during the summer months.


Taylor Hall was very invested in social and political issues as well. During the 1988 Presidential Race, Taylor Hall held a last minute presidential debate for students on campus. In the early 1990’s Taylor also held a discussion on the topic of homosexuality and was also very involved in hosting speakers and programming surrounding Black History Month.