Archive for November, 2008

Charles Foy, “Coerced Maritime Labor: Dark-Skinned Mariners as Prize Negroes, 1739-1783″

Tuesday, November 18th, 2008

 On November 11th Charles Foy presented his paper “Coerced Maritime Labor: Dark-Skinned Mariners as Prize Negroes, 1739-1783″ at Columbia University’s Seminar on Early American History and Culture.

HA Student writes winning grant

Friday, November 14th, 2008

The Charleston Area Charitable Foundation awarded a grant of $5422.76 to the Lincoln-Sargent Farm Foundation thanks to the grant-writing skills of Anthony Bowman, HA 2009. The grant will fund a portion of the Historical Administration exhibit on weaving and textiles that will be opening at Lincoln Log Cabin State Historic Site in April, 2009.

Newton Key, “The Aristocrat in the Tavern; the Informant in the Townhouse”

Friday, November 7th, 2008

Newton Key will be speaking at IUPUI: Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis. The IUPUI British and Irish Studies Group hosts his public talk, “The Aristocrat in the Tavern; the Informant in the Townhouse: Remapping the Public Sphere in Early Modern London,” on 10 November 2008, 3:00-4:00, in Lecture Hall 105, IUPUI.

Vermeer’s World: Colloquium/Dinner before the Lecture

Wednesday, November 5th, 2008

A reminder that there will be a colloquium at the Dudley House, 4:30-6:30, before the public lecture: “Vermeer’s World: the Dutch, the Chinese, and the birth of modernity,” by Timothy Brook, Tuesday, November 11, 2008, 7 p.m., at the Tarble Arts Center.

Prof. Brook has taught world history in Canada and the UK, and is the Director of the new University of Oxford China Centre launched in May. David Smith has agreed to launch the discussion with issues about teaching world history, but perhaps everyone attending might come prepared to weigh in this discussion. As it was reading Prof. Brook’s Vermeer’s Hat: The Seventeenth Century and the Dawn of the Global World (2008) that suggested to me that his method there might be useful teaching approach, I have made a couple of copies of the chapter “Journeys” in case you want to discuss that and its relation to teaching (two available hard copy History Office, one online reserve for His 5250, you probably know how to figure out the password).  The chapter begins with an analysis of Hendrik van der Burch, The Card Players (1660) (a  useful review of the book).

Finally, if you are interested in attending this colloquium (we will be providing a dinner from Bangkok Thai) please leave a comment below with your name (first name is fine), and whether you’d like Tofu, Shrimp, Chicken, or Beef (we will do a variety of curries, pad thai, pad sew).

We would like to open this colloquium to members of the Art Department and Asian Studies.