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Faculty Reading Groups


The Office of Faculty Development seeks to encourage interdisciplinary conversations about teaching and the academic life. To this end, we have acquired two sets of books for the 2013-2014 school year that we trust will provide starting points for provocative and enriching discussions: 

Fall 2013

Teaching Naked: How Moving Technology Out of Your College Classroom Will Improve Student Learning
Jose Antonio Bowen

Teaching Naked: How Moving Technology out of Your College Classroom Will Improve Student Learning

Introducing a new way to think about higher education, learning, and technology that prioritizes the benefits of the human dimension. José Bowen recognizes that technology is profoundly changing education and that if students are going to continue to pay enormous sums for campus classes, colleges will need to provide more than what can be found online and maximize "naked" face-to-face contact with faculty. Here, he illustrates how technology is most powerfully used outside the classroom, and, when used effectively, how it can ensure that students arrive to class more prepared for meaningful interaction with faculty. Bowen offers practical advice for faculty and administrators on how to engage students with new technology while restructuring classes into more active learning environments.

About the Author:

José Antonio Bowen is dean of the Meadows School of the Arts, Algur H. Meadows Chair, and professor of music at Southern Methodist University in Dallas, Texas.

Excerpt available here (from Jossey-Bass Publishers) 

 

Spring 2013

How Learning Works: Seven Research-Based Principles for Smart Teaching
Susan A. Ambrose, Michael W. Bridges, Michele DiPietro, Marsha C. Lovett, Marie K. Norman

How Learning Works

Distilling the research literature and translating the scientific approach into language relevant to a college or university teacher, this book introduces seven general principles of how students learn. The authors have drawn on research from a breadth of perspectives (cognitive, developmental, and social psychology; educational research; anthropology; demographics; organizational behavior) to identify a set of key principles underlying learning, from how effective organization enhances retrieval and use of information to what impacts motivation. Integrating theory with real-classroom examples in practice, this book helps faculty to apply cognitive science advances to improve their own teaching.

About the Authors:

Susan A. Ambrose is Vice Provost for Teaching and Learning and Professor of Education at Northeastern University in Boston, Massachusetts.

Michael W. Bridges is director of faculty development at UPMC St. Margaret Hospital in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania.

Michele DiPietro is associate director for graduate programs at the Eberly Center and instructor in the Department of Statistics at Carnegie Mellon.

Marsha C. Lovett is associate director for faculty development at the Eberly Center and associate teaching professor in the Department of Psychology at Carnegie Mellon.

Marie K. Norman is a teaching consultant and research associate at the Eberly Center and adjunct professor of anthropology at Carnegie Mellon.

The Eberly Center for Teaching Excellence at Carnegie Mellon University was created in 1982 with a mission to distill the research on learning for faculty and graduate students and to collaborate with them to design and implement meaningful educational experiences. The center's work is based on the idea that combining the science and art of teaching empowers college faculty to create the conditions for students to learn and, through this learning, transform their world.

Excerpt available here (from Jossey-Bass Publishers) 

 

Please contact us at (217) 581-7051 or email facdev@eiu.edu to sign up for reading groups. The Faculty Development office will coordinate a time and location for interested faculty.

We welcome suggestions of titles for future semesters.