Sexually Transmitted Infections (STIs) Information

  • Chlamydia is the most common sexually transmitted bacterial infection of the cervix and urethra.
  • Chlamydia is estimated to affect between 3 and 4 million people annually in the United States. 
  • Most men and 75% of women experience no symptoms.
  • Chlamydia has been found to be a frequent cause of infertility.
  • Current guidelines recommend that women between the ages of 17 and 25, who are sexually active, be tested for Chlamydia infection annually with their gynecologic exam.
  • Symptoms of Chlamydia infection can include light bleeding, especially after intercourse, burning during urination and discharge.
  • 40% of women with untreated Chlamydia develop pelvic inflammatory disease.
  • 20% of women who develop pelvic inflammatory disease become infertile.
  • If you test positive for the infection you should notify present and past partners so they can be tested.
  • Current and past partners will be treated for Chlamydia even if they test negative. 
  • It is treated and cured with antibiotics for both sexual partners.
  • Partners should refrain from intercourse until both have finished treatment.
  • Current guidelines recommend that women be retested for Chlamydia 3 to 4 months after treatment, but no sooner than 3 weeks after the completion of treatment.
  • Gonorrhea is a bacterial sexually transmitted infection that is spread through sexual contact with another person.
  • The bacteria are found in moist areas of the body (the vagina, penis, throat and rectum).
  • Any sexually active person can be infected with gonorrhea.
  • It is most common in younger people, ages 15 to 30 with multiple sex partners.
  • Gonorrhea is spread through sexual contact. This includes penis to vagina, penis to mouth, penis to rectum and mouth to vagina contact.
  • Symptoms for men include burning while urinating and a thick yellowish-white discharge from the penis. 
  • Some men may have no symptoms.
  • Symptoms for women may include discharge from the vagina and burning with urination, but they can also be asymptomatic.
  • Gonorrhea is treated and cured with antibiotics for both partners.
  • If you test positive for the infection you should notify current and past partners so they can be tested and treated.
  • Partners should refrain from intercourse until both have finished treatment.