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 Alan D Pocaro

Alan D Pocaro

Assistant Professor of Art - Art Foundations and Digital Art

Office: 1917 - DFAC
Email: adpocaro@eiu.edu
Website: http://www.alanpocaro.com/

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Education


2001 B.F.A. Art History, Ohio University, Athens, Ohio
2006 M.A. Education, University of Akron, Akron, Ohio
2009 M.F.A. Painting/Drawing, Miami University, Oxford, Ohio

Professional Organizations

2014 -            Eastern Illinois University, Assistant Professor of Art, Foundations and Digital Media
2012 - 2014, Eastern Illinois University, Instructor of Art, Foundations and Digital Media
2009 - 2012, The Art Academy of Cincinnati, Adjunct Faculty, Drawing and Painting
2009 - 2012, Miami University Hamilton, Visiting Faculty, Foundations and Art Appreciation

Research

Much of my work is composed electronically, but like most art, it is rooted in a physical engagement with the world around me. Old paintings, new landscapes, compelling sounds and errant brushstrokes are photographed, scanned and recorded yielding a multi-sensory record of place. These inputs are further edited and rationalized to create a kind of “digital montage” which is returned to the physical world that gave rise to it by way of paper, canvas, archival ink, traditional oil paint, and the oscillating electrons in your mobile device.

Despite my sincere conviction that art is, at its core, both a physical process and material phenomenon, I also recognize that in less than decade, the Internet has fundamentally altered the way we interact with everything. Our first experience of new artwork is more often than not on an LCD screen, not in an art-space or on the pages of a glossy magazine. Virtual galleries, which only a few years ago were treated as a joke, have become a legitimate means of disseminating artwork.

What does it mean for our conceptions of original and reproduction when individuals separated by oceans can access the same visual content simultaneously; multiple screens each staking-claim to the “original”? By challenging the viewer to investigate the qualities that distinguish digital processes from traditional touches, I hope that my pieces embody my broader interest in truth and perception and the ways in which life in the 21st century has altered our experience of both.

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